Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3
of a deal. and we go over the cliff, so to speak. some economists are saying that means that the u.s. economy goes into recession. >> well, i think we would go into recession, we'd exacerbate our unemployment, underemployment problems, unless it was reversed very quickly. but what a lot of people haven't focused on is, you know, it takes 60 votes to get something through the senate unless you use something called budget reconciliation, which only requires a majority vote. under current rules you can only use that if you're making the deficit less, not more. so if you try to reverse a tax increase or you try to reverse a spending cut, you're not going to be able to do that unless you have 60 votes. and that's going to be tough. >> susie: all right, we have american voters in the polls now who are going to decide who's the next president. but from your point of view, which candidate has the best plans to solve this fiscal crisis, if at all? we have less than a minute. >> in all candor, susie, neither one of them have lay out a comprehensive and credible plan to solve this problem. i wi
of the u.s. conference of catholic bishops, offered benedictions at both the democratic and republican conventions. for months, the bishops have led a vigorous campaign against the obama administration's policy mandating that employers, including many religious employers, offer free coverage of contraceptive services to their employees. the bishops accuse the obama administration of violating religious liberty. it's unclear how much those efforts have changed any opinions among voters. polls show catholics remain deeply divided, and that could be especially important in battleground states such as ohio, pennsylvania and florida. while much of the focus has been on the economy, green says here at the end of the campaign, other social issues may play an important role. >> there's some strong incentives for the parties to reach out for secondary issues. issues like women's rights, religious liberty, the environment, foreign policy. because if voters are evenly divided on their most salient issue, the economy, they're going to make their decision perhaps on some of these secondary issues.
if possible. we'll be talking to you all night long. and we have one more projection. this is in a u.s. senate race in vermont. bernie sanders the independent who caucuses with the democrats in vermont has been re-elected. before we look at some of the initial results in the senate races a word about our projections. the newshour doesn't call any race. it is our policy to report results as projected by the associated press. we'll also tell you when two television networks have called a winner in a state if the a.p. has not done so. now we'll go to geoffrey brown for more on these and other congressional matters. >> brown: thanks, gwen. i'm with, here with political editor christina bell and tony and stuart rothenberg, editor of the rothenberg political report. so if we start to look at the senate, they were talking about indiana called early for mitt romney on the presidential side. stu, that is not the case in this important senate race. >> we thought it might be when we first looked back months ago. >> brown: you mean months ago. richard murdoch ended up defeating richard lugar long-time sen
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3